COVID-19 vaccines with HealthPartners & Park Nicollet
Latest COVID-19 vaccination eligibility

We’re able to schedule vaccination appointments for anyone 12 years old or older. You don’t have to be a current patient of ours to make an appointment.

When you come to your appointment, please bring photo identification with you, as well as your insurance ID card (if you have insurance).

Following the latest guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we’re currently giving booster doses of the Pfizer vaccine only for previous Pfizer recipients who:

  • Are 65 years old or older
  • Are 18 to 64 years old AND:
    • Have an underlying medical condition that puts them at increased risk of severe COVID-19, OR
    • Live in a long-term care facility, OR
    • Live in a group home setting for people with disabilities or severe cognitive dysfunction, OR
    • Work in a role that may put them at increased risk of COVID-19

Eligible patients will be notified via email and can schedule a booster dose online. If you’re eligible, you don’t need to wait for an email to schedule. You can schedule your Pfizer booster dose at least six months after your second dose – you can’t receive it sooner.

Due to high demand, immediate appointments for booster doses may be limited. You can still schedule your appointment for a future date – if you do, we’ll remind you when it’s coming up.

You can also schedule your booster dose through another source, like your nursing home, a pharmacy, the Veterans Health Administration (the VA), your employer or the state.

We’re awaiting further guidance from public health authorities regarding booster shots for previous Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine recipients. Once we receive guidance, we’ll work to identify and notify eligible patients to share information about how to schedule appointments.

We’ll continue to evaluate our approach to booster doses as new data emerges and new guidance becomes available.

Moderately to severely immunocompromised patients who received their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine at least 28 days ago are now eligible for an additional immunocompromised dose.

Eligible patients will be notified via email or text message and can schedule an immunocompromised dose online. If you’re eligible, you don’t need to wait for an email to schedule.

When you make your appointment, you’ll have the option to schedule it in advance. We’ll remind you when it’s coming up. You can also schedule your immunocompromised dose through another source, like your nursing home, a pharmacy, the Veterans Health Administration (the VA), your employer or the state.

We’ll continue to evaluate our approach to immunocompromised doses as new data emerges and new guidance from public health officials becomes available.

COVID-19 vaccine appointments for patients who are 12 through 17 years old may be scheduled online.

  • Patients, or their parent or guardian, can schedule online or call a primary care clinic.
  • Additional information about the patient’s parent or guardian must be provided in order to schedule an appointment.
  • A parent or guardian should attend vaccine appointments with their child. Parental consent is required for anyone under 18 years old to be vaccinated.
Preparing for your COVID-19 vaccine

At your appointment, you’ll receive one of three COVID-19 vaccines currently approved or authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

  • The Pfizer vaccine has been approved (as Comirnaty) for people 16 years old and older – it’s also been authorized for emergency use in people 12-15 years old. This vaccine requires two doses given 21 days apart. An additional dose is recommended for some immunocompromised patients 28 days after the second dose. A booster dose is also recommended for some patients at least six months after the second dose.
  • The Moderna vaccine has been authorized for emergency use in people 18 years old or older. This vaccine requires two doses given 28 days apart. An additional dose is recommended for some immunocompromised patients 28 days after the second dose.
  • The Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine has been authorized for emergency use in people 18 years old or older. This vaccine is given as a single dose. No additional doses or booster doses are recommended at this time.

All vaccines are effective against COVID-19. For detailed information about each COVID-19 vaccine, please review:

During your appointment

Your appointment will last roughly 30 minutes, including check-in and consent, vaccination, and observation. Wear a T-shirt or other loose-fitting clothing so we can easily access your upper arm to deliver the vaccine.

You’ll get a record card with information about the COVID-19 vaccine you received. Keep this card with your other important documents.

If you need a second dose, immunocompromised dose or booster dose, we’ll help you schedule before you leave. Your future appointment(s) will be at the same location as your first appointment. Please bring your vaccination card with you to any future appointments.

After your appointment: 5 things to do
If you receive the Pfizer vaccine
  • Your vaccine is administered in two doses, given 21 days apart. Before you leave your first appointment, we’ll help you schedule your second-dose appointment. If you didn’t schedule your second dose when you received your first dose, you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine second dose online.
  • An additional dose, given at least 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients. If you’re eligible – and you didn’t schedule your immunocompromised dose when you received your previous doses – you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine immunocompromised dose online.
  • A booster dose, given at least six months after your second dose, is recommended for some patients. If you’re eligible – and you didn’t schedule your booster dose when you received your previous doses – you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine booster dose online.
If you receive the Moderna vaccine
  • Your vaccine is administered in two doses, given 28 days apart. Before you leave your first appointment, we’ll help you schedule your second-dose appointment. If you didn’t schedule your second dose when you received your first dose, you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine second dose online.
  • An additional dose, given at least 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients. If you’re eligible – and you didn’t schedule your immunocompromised dose when you received your previous doses – you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine immunocompromised dose online.
  • No booster doses are officially recommended at this time.
If you receive the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine
  • Your vaccine is administered as a single dose. You’re considered immunized against COVID-19 about two weeks later.
  • No additional doses or booster doses are officially recommended at this time.

V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that provides personalized health check-ins after you’re vaccinated. V-safe can also remind you to get your second dose. Through v-safe, you can report your health experiences to help keep COVID-19 vaccines safe for everyone.

When you get vaccinated, you’ll receive information about how to enroll in v-safe. If you can’t find this information, give us a call. V-safe is a service of the CDC – V-safe is not affiliated with HealthPartners.

For the first 72 hours after vaccination, you may experience side effects. Symptoms are typically temporary, mild to moderate, and can be managed at home with over-the-counter remedies.

  • In some cases, children and teenagers may experience more side effects than adults. This is not unusual – because younger people tend to have stronger immune systems, the vaccine creates a more robust response as it trains the body.

If you need help managing your side effects, or in the unlikely event they appear to be worsening, please call your doctor. You can also call our nurses 24/7 at 800-551-0859 (HealthPartners CareLine℠) or 952-993-4665 (Park Nicollet Nurse Line).

VAERS

The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is a national program managed by the CDC and FDA to monitor the safety of all vaccines licensed in the United States. VAERS (PDF) collects and reviews reports of adverse events that happen after vaccination.

An “adverse event” is any health problem or “side effect” that happens after a vaccination. VAERS cannot determine if a vaccine caused an adverse event but can determine if further investigation is needed. VAERS is a service of the CDC and FDA – VAERS is not affiliated with HealthPartners.

After you’ve been fully vaccinated, there are still steps you should take to help keep vulnerable people in your community safe and healthy.

Store the vaccination card you received with your other important documents. You may need this card for future reference.

In addition, after you receive your final dose, you can use myHP for iOS to add a proof of vaccination to your iPhone’s Apple Wallet (not available for patients under 18 years old).

Not sure about the vaccines or have questions?

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. With so much information out there, sometimes it can be hard to separate fact from fiction. We’re here to help you feel confident about your choice to get vaccinated.

Want a personalized vaccine consultation? You can schedule a virtual visit with one of our nurses or doctors. We can help you learn more about the vaccines so you can decide if you’d like to receive one.

Below you can find answers to some of our most frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccines.

FAQs on availability

You may be offered a COVID-19 vaccine during a regular in-person appointment at one of our clinics. If we can vaccinate you at that time, we’ll let you know and walk you through the process.

If you’d like to make an appointment just for a COVID-19 vaccine, you can get vaccinated at one of our convenient locations in Minnesota or western Wisconsin. Different locations have different vaccines – you’ll be able to choose where you want to be vaccinated. Availability of vaccines may change from time to time.

The Pfizer vaccine is available at:

  • HealthPartners Clinic – Arden Hills, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Bloomington, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Brooklyn Center, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Coon Rapids, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Maplewood, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Minneapolis, MN (Nokomis)
  • HealthPartners Clinic – St. Paul, MN (Como)
  • HealthPartners Clinic – St. Paul, MN (Wabasha)
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Stillwater, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Woodbury, MN
  • HealthPartners Riverway Clinic – Anoka, MN
  • HealthPartners Riverway Clinic – Elk River, MN
  • Hutchinson Health – Hutchinson, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Brooklyn Center, MN (Brookdale)
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Champlin, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Chanhassen, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Lakeville, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Minnetonka, MN (Carlson Parkway)
  • Park Nicollet Clinic & Specialty Center – Burnsville, MN (14000 Building)
  • Park Nicollet Clinic & Specialty Center – Shakopee, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic & Specialty Center – St. Louis Park, MN (3850 Building)
  • Olivia Hospital – Olivia, MN
  • Westfields Hospital – New Richmond, WI

The Moderna vaccine is available at:

  • Amery Hospital & Clinic – Amery Clinic – Amery, WI
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Apple Valley, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Inver Grove Heights, MN
  • HealthPartners Clinic – Hudson, WI
  • HealthPartners Clinic – St. Louis Park, MN (West)
  • HealthPartners Clinic – St. Paul, MN (Midway/Center for International Health)
  • HealthPartners Clinic – White Bear Lake, MN
  • HealthPartners North Suburban Family Physicians – Lino Lakes, MN
  • HealthPartners North Suburban Family Physicians – Roseville, MN
  • HealthPartners Riverway Clinic – Andover, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic ­– Bloomington, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic ­– Eagan, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Eden Prairie, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Minneapolis, MN (Blaisdell)
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Rogers, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic – Plymouth, MN
  • Park Nicollet Clinic & Specialty Center – Maple Grove, MN

We’re not currently offering the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine.

We hope to be able to offer this vaccine option again once we receive more supply.

Many of our Well@Work clinics and OB-GYN clinics also offer COVID-19 vaccines. Please call your clinic to get the latest details.

Following the latest CDC guidelines, we’re currently giving booster doses of the Pfizer vaccine only for previous Pfizer recipients who:

  • Are 65 years old or older
  • Are 18 to 64 years old AND:
    • Have an underlying medical condition that puts them at increased risk of severe COVID-19, OR
    • Live in a long-term care facility, OR
    • Live in a group home setting for people with disabilities or severe cognitive dysfunction, OR
    • Work in a role that may put them at increased risk of COVID-19

Eligible patients who’ve already completed their vaccine series will be notified via email and can schedule a booster dose online.

  • If you’re eligible, you don’t need to wait for an email to schedule.
  • You can schedule your Pfizer booster dose at least six months after your second dose – you can’t receive it sooner.
  • Due to high demand, immediate appointments for booster doses may be limited. You can still schedule your appointment for a future date – if you do, we’ll remind you when it’s coming up. You can also schedule your booster dose somewhere else.

We’re awaiting further guidance from public health authorities regarding booster shots for previous Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine recipients. Once we receive guidance, we’ll work to identify and notify eligible patients to share information about how to schedule appointments.

We’ll continue to evaluate our approach to booster doses as new data emerges and new guidance becomes available.

The CDC currently recommends that moderately to severely immunocompromised Pfizer or Moderna vaccine recipients get an additional dose.

Eligible patients who’ve already completed their vaccine series will be notified via email or text message and can schedule an immunocompromised dose online.

  • Immunocompromised doses for eligible patients should be administered at least 28 days after a second dose.
  • If you’re eligible, you don’t need to wait for an email or text message to schedule.
  • Appointments can be scheduled in advance – you’ll get a reminder when your appointment is coming up. You can also schedule your immunocompromised dose somewhere else.
  • Immunocompromised doses should be the same type as the first and second dose. For example, if you received two doses of Pfizer previously, your additional dose should be Pfizer. If you received two doses of Moderna, your additional dose should be Moderna.

We’ll continue to evaluate our approach to immunocompromised doses as new data emerges and new guidance from public health officials becomes available.

Yes. Anyone who is eligible for a second, immunocompromised or booster dose can schedule it at HealthPartners, regardless of where you received your previous dose(s).

Yes. You may have vaccine access through your nursing home, pharmacies, the Veterans Health Administration (the VA), your employer or the state.

For vaccinations (except at Veterans Health Administration) in Minnesota or Wisconsin, your medical record will be automatically updated during your next appointment with us. There’s nothing else you need to do.

For vaccinations at Veterans Health Administration or in other states, please bring your vaccination card with you to your next appointment with us. We’ll use the information on your card to update your medical record.

After you get vaccinated, you’ll get a record card with information about the COVID-19 vaccine you received. Keep this card with your other important documents.

In addition, after you receive your final dose, you can use myHP for iOS to add a proof of vaccination to your iPhone’s Apple Wallet (not available for patients under 18 years old).

We’re dedicated to equity in vaccine distribution.

The CDC also emphasizes the importance of equity, noting, “To reduce the substantial toll COVID-19 has had on individuals and communities, we need to work together to address inequities in the social determinants of health that increase risk of severe illness from COVID-19 for racial and ethnic minority groups.”

FAQs on eligibility

The Pfizer vaccine is currently approved for people 16 years old or older and authorized for people 12-15 years old. The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines are currently authorized for people 18 years old and older.

COVID-19 vaccine appointments for patients younger than 18 years old may be scheduled online.

  • Patients, or their parent or guardian, can schedule online or call a primary care clinic.
  • Additional information about the patient’s parent or guardian must be provided in order to schedule an appointment.
  • A parent or guardian should attend vaccine appointments with their child. Parental consent is required for anyone under 18 years old to be vaccinated.

The CDC recommends all people who are pregnant or breastfeeding get vaccinated against COVID-19. This recommendation is based on an analysis of nearly 2,500 pregnant people who received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine series before 20 weeks of pregnancy. In particular, the rate of miscarriages among pregnant women who received a COVID-19 vaccine was similar to the expected rate of miscarriage among all women. This suggests there isn’t any evidence for an increased risk of miscarriage due to vaccination.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, as well as the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, also recommend pregnant or nursing mothers get vaccinated against COVID-19. To help you make an informed decision, discuss COVID-19 vaccination with your doctor or midwife.

Yes. While there’s likely some natural immunity following a COVID-19 infection, immunity can vary by individual. And natural immunity may be weaker if you had a mild or asymptomatic infection.

Vaccination is recommended as soon as your COVID-19 symptoms resolve and your isolation period has passed.

No, you can’t get the COVID-19 vaccine if you currently have COVID-19.

  • If you don’t have symptoms, stay home and isolate for at least 10 days after your first positive test.
  • If you have symptoms, stay home and isolate for at least 10 days after your symptoms started. In addition, continue isolating until at least 24 hours have passed with no fever (without the use of fever-reducing medications) and you’re seeing improvement in your other symptoms.

After you’ve completed isolation, we recommend getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

Yes. There’s no waiting period between receiving the COVID-19 vaccine and receiving other vaccines – you can receive your vaccines on any schedule, or at the same time.

It’s especially important for kids and teens to keep up with their doctor-recommended vaccination schedule while also getting protected against COVID-19.

At this time, we’re not recommending that any COVID-19 vaccine recipients get another vaccine series from a different manufacturer.

We’ll continue to evaluate our approach as new data emerges and new guidance from public health officials becomes available.

If you’re currently enrolled in the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial, you can learn whether you received a placebo or the AstraZeneca vaccine. This is called unblinding.

If you’re interested in another vaccine, please call 651-254-5331 to start the unblinding process. Unblinded participants are still eligible to continue in the study.

  • Unblinded participants who received a placebo should schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment. You’ll receive a COVID-19 vaccine that’s currently approved or authorized for use in the U.S.
  • Unblinded participants who received the AstraZeneca vaccine are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their final dose. No additional doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine (or any other COVID-19 vaccine) are needed.

If you’re currently enrolled in a COVID-19 vaccine trial and you’re interested in an approved or authorized vaccine, please contact your trial’s administrator.

Your trial’s administrator can tell you more about unblinding procedures so you can learn whether you received a placebo or an active vaccine.

Novavax trials

Unblinded participants of a Novavax trial who received a placebo should schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment. You’ll receive a COVID-19 vaccine that’s currently approved or authorized for use in the U.S.

Unblinded participants of a Novavax trial who received an active vaccine are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their final dose. No additional doses of the Novavax vaccine (or any other COVID-19 vaccine) are needed.

Other trials

Unblinded participants of other COVID-19 vaccine trials who received a placebo should schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment. You’ll receive a COVID-19 vaccine that’s currently approved or authorized for use in the U.S.

Unblinded participants of other COVID-19 vaccine trials who received an active vaccine are not considered fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Talk with your doctor and your trial’s administrator to see if you should receive an approved or authorized COVID-19 vaccine.

FAQs on effectiveness and safety

We’re here to help you get trusted answers about the vaccines so you can feel confident in your choice to get vaccinated.

Yes. The data suggest all currently approved or authorized vaccines are effective in preventing illness from COVID-19, with the greatest protection coming against severe illness, hospitalization and death.

You must complete your full vaccine series for maximum protection. Efficacy of incomplete series has not been systematically evaluated. If you’re not sure whether you’ve completed your full vaccine series, please contact your care team.

All vaccines are effective, and all vaccines are considered clinically equivalent in preventing hospitalization and death due to severe COVID-19.

Given the excellent performance and effectiveness of all vaccines in this important measurement, we strongly encourage you to receive any approved or authorized vaccine that’s offered. The vaccine you should get is the one you’re able to schedule soonest.

No. The vaccines have always been effective and continue to offer excellent protection against COVID-19.

With some vaccines (like tetanus or flu), your body’s immune response may decrease over time. Booster shots are a normal way to restore and extend a vaccine’s protection against illness.

As scientists learn more about COVID-19, how it spreads and how to fight it, booster shots have emerged as an important tool. That means getting a booster shot can help make you, your friends and family, and your community safer and healthier.

All vaccine manufacturers must meet strict safety standards. These standards were established before the COVID-19 pandemic, and the COVID-19 vaccines went through the same rigorous clinical trials that other vaccines go through.

While the COVID-19 vaccines do seem to cause more side effects than a typical flu vaccine, all evidence suggests that the COVID-19 vaccines are very safe. Side effects are a sign the immune system is responding as it should.

No, there’s no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect development or fertility.

The vaccines don’t change the body’s DNA or functioning in any way. Instead, they teach the body’s immune system to recognize and fight the coronavirus in case it’s ever encountered.

The immune system is separate from the reproductive system, so there’s no reason to believe a vaccine would affect fertility, future offspring, or growth and development.

If you still have questions, we recommend you talk with a doctor or talk with a nurse.

The Pfizer vaccine requires two doses to be effective. The doses are given 21 days apart. If you didn’t schedule your second dose when you received your first dose, you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine second dose online.

  • An additional dose, 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients.
  • A booster dose, at least six months after your second dose, is recommended for some other patients.

The Moderna vaccine requires two doses to be effective. The doses are given 28 days apart. If you didn’t schedule your second dose when you received your first dose, you can schedule your COVID-19 vaccine second dose online.

  • An additional dose, 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients.

The Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine is given as a single dose.

  • No additional doses or booster doses are officially recommended at this time.

For the Pfizer vaccine, it takes about two weeks after your second dose for your body to build up protection.

  • An additional dose, 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients.
  • A booster dose, at least six months after your second dose, is recommended for some other patients.

For the Moderna vaccine, it takes about two weeks after your second dose for your body to build up protection.

  • An additional dose, 28 days after your second dose, is recommended for some immunocompromised patients.

For the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine, it takes about two weeks after your single dose for your body to build up protection.

Very few vaccines are 100% effective, and these COVID-19 vaccines are no exception. Therefore it’s still possible, although unlikely, for a person to get COVID-19 even after getting vaccinated.

For the first 72 hours after vaccination, you may experience side effects. Symptoms are typically temporary, mild to moderate and can be managed at home with over-the-counter remedies.

  • In some cases, children and teenagers may experience more side effects than adults. This is not unusual – because younger people tend to have stronger immune systems, the vaccine creates a more robust response as it trains the body.

If you need help managing your side effects, or in the unlikely event they appear to be worsening, please talk to your doctor. You can also call our nurses 24/7 at 800-551-0859 (HealthPartners CareLine℠) or 952-993-4665 (Park Nicollet Nurse Line).

No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines actually contains the coronavirus. Instead, they teach your body how to recognize and fight it.

It takes a few weeks for each vaccine to become fully effective, so you could get COVID-19 just before or just after you’re vaccinated. That’s why, until two weeks have passed since your final dose, it’s important to continue to take other preventive measures that help protect you, your family and your community.

No. COVID-19 and the flu are caused by two different viruses. To be protected from both, you need two different vaccinations.

FAQs on insurance and cost

While the cost of the actual vaccine is covered by the federal government, insurance plans will cover the cost of administering the vaccine – you won’t pay anything.

HealthPartners health plan members have 100% coverage for the COVID-19 vaccine. Most other health plans are covering it as well.

If you have any further questions, please check with your insurance company by calling the Member Services number located on your ID card.

If you don’t have health insurance, the costs for administering the vaccine will be covered under a special government program called the Provider Relief Fund. You won’t pay anything.

FAQs on other COVID-19 safety measures

After you’ve been fully vaccinated, there are still steps you should take to help keep vulnerable people in your community safe and healthy. That includes continuing to wear a mask where indicated, washing your hands frequently and more.

We recommend everyone who’s able to get the COVID-19 vaccine does so.

We don’t yet know enough about COVID-19 to know if population (herd) immunity is possible through vaccination. That’s what happens when a majority of the population is immune to a disease and protects those who aren’t by stopping the spread of it. We also don’t yet know how long population immunity could take to reach, even if it is possible.

Vaccination is the best and clearest way to stop the spread of COVID-19 without many more people getting sick.